The Viceregal Lion
  1. The Governor General of Canada
  2. Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette

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Heralds Extraordinary

Like Heralds Emeritus, Heralds Extraordinary are honorary positions held by individuals who have made particularly notable contributions to Canadian heraldry. On occasion, they can perform duties on behalf of the Canadian Heraldic Authority.

Dauphin Herald Extraordinary
Robert Pichette, O.N.B (1995- )
The two main components of the badge are a blue heraldic dolphin displayed on a stylization of a Mi'kmaq trade silver brooch of the type made for fur traders in the 17th and 18th centuries and traded to many of the First Nations. The badge is outlined with a wavy band of blue, referring both to the waters of the Rivière Dauphin (the former name of the Annapolis River) and more widely to the seas, lakes and rivers of Atlantic Canada.

Niagara Herald Extraordinary
Gordon Macpherson, C.M. (1999- )
The badge is placed on a red compass rose of sixteen points. As a compass shows direction, it indicates nationwide or even international outreach. It can refer to the Niagara River itself and its location at the centre of the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence River transportation system. Also, it indicates the national and international reach of heraldry. At the centre of the badge are three wavy stripes that indicate flowing water. As they are shown vertically, they make a reference not only to the south-to-north direction of the Niagara River, but also to its most famous feature, the Niagara Falls.

Cowichan Herald Extraordinary
Graham Anderson (1999-2012)
The design is based on the word "Cowichan," which means "place warmed by the sun." The two animals in the centre, depicted in the Salish style, are based on a design by Cowichan artist Wayne Charlie. They are a horned dog, Wagaas, and an eagle, Yuhwala, two of the most important creatures from traditional Cowichan teachings.

Albion Herald Extraordinary
D. Ralph Spence (2006- )
Red, white and blue are the colours of the Royal Union Flag and represent the Loyalist founders of the Hamilton region, the location of the Albion Falls at Red Hill Creek. Albion is an ancient name for Great Britain. The broken stripes in the centre of the badge symbolize the water of Albion Falls flowing over the Niagara Escarpment.

Capilano Herald Extraordinary
Helen K. Mussallem, C.C. (2006-2012)
The salmon represent new life and their position refers to the idea of the circle of life. The Coast Salish artistic style used to depict the salmon pays tribute to the fact that the name Capilano is derived from a word in Halkomelem, a Coast Salish language. The rope around the badge refers to the famous suspension bridge spanning the Capilano Canyon, which lies between North and West Vancouver. The points of the diamond shape symbolize the four sacred directions for the First Nations, the horizontal directions of life and the vertical directions of the spirit.

Rouge Herald Extraordinary
Roger A. Lindsay (2006- )
The fleurs-de-lis and the red colour allude to the Rouge River in the eastern part of the City of Toronto, a river named by French explorers in reference to red clay. The space at the centre of the badge resembles a white rose, a symbol of York, the original name of Toronto.

Heralds Extraordinary
Dauphin Herald
Extraordinary

Robert Pichette, O.N.B
(1995- )
Moncton, New Brunswick
Niagara Herald
Extraordinary

Gordon Macpherson, C.M.
(1999- )
Burlington, Ontario
Cowichan Herald
Extraordinary

Graham Anderson
(1999-2012)
Cowichan Bay, British Columbia
Albion Herald Extraordinary
D. Ralph Spence
(2006- )
Hamilton, Ontario
Capilano Herald Extraordinary
Helen K. Mussallem, C.C.
(2006-2012)
Vancouver,
British Columbia
Rouge Herald Extraordinary
Roger A. Lindsay
(2006- )
Toronto, Ontario