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Presentation of Honours at the Citadelle

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September 17, 2011

Governor General to Present 29 Honours at the Citadelle of Québec


OTTAWA —His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada, will present honours to 29 recipients at the Residence of the Governor General at the Citadelle of Québec, on Tuesday, September 20, 2011, at 1:30 p.m.

The Governor General will present the following honours:

-          two insignia of the Order of Merit of the Police Forces;
-          three Military Valour Decorations;
-          eight Meritorious Service Decorations (Military Division);
-          fifteen Decorations for Bravery; and
-          one Governor General’s Northern Medal

The ceremony’s schedule, fact sheets on each of the honours being presented, and the list of recipients are attached. For more information on the Canadian Honours System, please visit our website at http://www.gg.ca/document.aspx?id=67&lan=eng.

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Media covering the ceremony must contact the Rideau Hall Press Office the day before the event. They will have to show their accreditation at the Citadelle gate, and access the Ballroom through the administration door.

Media information:
Marie-Pierre Bélanger
Rideau Hall Press Office
613-852-3248 (cellular)
marie-pierre.belanger@gg.ca

Follow GGDavidJohnston and RideauHall on Facebook and Twitter


CEREMONY SCHEDULE

Members of the media are asked to observe the following schedule:

12:45 p.m.:

Media arrive at the Citadelle

13:30 p.m.:

Ceremony begins

 

The Governor General speaks

 

The Governor General presents the honours

2:15 p.m.:

Ceremony ends

2:30 p.m.:

Interview with recipients


ORDER OF MERIT OF THE POLICE FORCES

Established in October 2000, the Order of Merit of the Police Forces honours the leadership and exceptional service or distinctive merit displayed by the men and women of the Canadian Police Services, and recognizes their commitment to this country. The primary focus is on exceptional merit, contributions to policing and community development. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II is the Order’s Sovereign, the governor general is its chancellor and a Commander, and the commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is its Principal Commander.

Commander (C.O.M.)

Recognizes outstanding meritorious service and demonstrated leadership in duties of great responsibility over an extended period, usually at the national or international level.

Officer (O.O.M.)

Recognizes outstanding meritorious service in duties of responsibility over an extended period, usually at the regional or provincial level.

Member (M.O.M.)

Recognizes exceptional service or performance of duty over an extended period, usually at the local or regional/provincial level.

LIST OF RECIPIENTS

MEMBERS

Director Marc Parent, M.O.M.

Service de police de la Ville de Montréal, Que.

Assistant Director Mario Plante, M.O.M.

Service de police de la Ville de Montréal, Que.



MILITARY VALOUR DECORATIONS

Military Valour Decorations are national honours awarded to recognize acts of valour, self-sacrifice or devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy. The decorations were approved by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1993. They consist of the Victoria Cross, the Star of Military Valour and the Medal of Military Valour.

A person is eligible to be awarded a Military Valour Decoration if that person, on or after January 1, 1993, was a member of the Canadian Forces, or a member of an allied armed force that was serving with or in conjunction with the Canadian Forces. The Decorations may be awarded posthumously.

The Victoria Cross (V.C.) recognizes the most conspicuous bravery, a daring or pre‑eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice, or extreme devotion to duty, in the presence of the enemy.

The Star of Military Valour (S.M.V.) recognizes distinguished and valiant service in the presence of the enemy.

The Medal of Military Valour (M.M.V.) recognizes an act of valour or devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.

LIST OF RECIPIENTS

MEDAL OF MILITARY VALOUR

Lieutenant Guillaume Frédéric Caron, M.M.V., C.D.

Rimouski, Que.

Corporal Bradley D. Casey, M.M.V.

Pugwash, N.S.

Sergeant Marc-André J. M. Rousseau, M.M.V.

La Sarre, Que.


CITATIONS

Lieutenant Guillaume Frédéric Caron, M.M.V., C.D.
Rimouski, Quebec
Medal of Military Valour

As part of an Operational Mentor and Liaison Team in Afghanistan from April to October 2009, Lieutenant Caron contributed to the battle group’s operational success. While supervising an Afghan National Army company, he distinguished himself during combat operations through his courage on the battlefield, notably when he led the difficult recovery of an Afghan helicopter that had been shot down. Through his leadership, combat skills and tactical acumen, Lieutenant Caron has brought great credit to the Canadian Forces.

Corporal Bradley D. Casey, M.M.V.
Pugwash, Nova Scotia
Medal of Military Valour

On February 18, 2010, Corporal Casey risked his life to provide treatment to a wounded Afghan National Army soldier. With bullets striking around him, he provided critical treatment and transported the casualty to the medical evacuation helicopter. Despite being under constant fire, Corporal Casey never wavered from his task, ensuring the provision of exceptional medical care to a fellow soldier.

Sergeant Marc-André J. M. Rousseau, M.M.V.
La Sarre, Quebec
Medal of Military Valour

On August 3, 2010, while Sergeant Rousseau was conducting an exercise with a group of civilians at the Kandahar Airfield, insurgents blew a hole in the fence in an attempt to force their way inside. Despite being under heavy fire, Sergeant Rousseau led two comrades over exposed ground, occupied a nearby vehicle and aggressively engaged the enemy. Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant Rousseau demonstrated outstanding leadership and courage, which proved vital to winning the battle and saving countless lives on the airfield.


MERITORIOUS SERVICE DECORATIONS (MILITARY DIVISION)

The Meritorious Service Decorations were created by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, in 1984, to recognize individuals whose specific deeds or activities over a limited period of time (from five minutes to five years) have:

  • demonstrated an outstanding level of service; or
  • set an exemplary standard of achievement; and
  • brought honour to or benefited Canada

This accomplishment must have taken place after June 11, 1984.

The Meritorious Service Cross — Military Division (M.S.C.) recognizes a military deed or activity that has been performed in an outstandingly professional manner, according to a rare high standard that brings considerable benefit or great honour to the Canadian Forces

The Meritorious Service Medal — Military Division (M.S.M.) recognizes a military deed or activity performed in a highly professional manner, according to a very high standard that benefits or brings honour to the Canadian Forces

LIST OF RECIPIENTS

MERITORIOUS SERVICE CROSS

Chief Warrant Officer Jules Joseph Moreau, M.M.M., M.S.C., C.D.

Saint-Pamphile, Que.

Lieutenant-Colonel Jocelyn J. J. M. J. Paul, M.S.C., C.D.

Wendake Indian Reserve, Que.


MERITORIOUS SERVICE MEDAL

Corporal François-Jonathan Gilles Michel Hébert, M.S.M.

Montréal, Que.

Major Joseph Serge Raynald Morin, M.S.M., C.D.

Lac Mégantic, Que.

Major Yannick Pépin, M.S.M., C.D. (posthumous)

Warwick, Que.

Sergeant Joseph François Colin Piché, M.S.M., C.D.

St-Basile-de-Portneuf, Que.

Chief Warrant Officer Joseph Gérard Gilbert Poirier, M.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.

Verdun, Que.

Chief Warrant Officer Ernest Gérard Joseph Poitras, M.S.M., C.D.

Tracadie, N.B.


CITATIONS

Chief Warrant Officer Jules Joseph Moreau, M.M.M., M.S.C., C.D.
Saint-Pamphile, Quebec
Meritorious Service Cross

As regimental sergeant-major of 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group, from April to October 2009, Chief Warrant Officer Moreau demonstrated leadership and selfless dedication, which set the standards for the unit’s success. His fighting spirit and judicious guidance helped soldiers deal with the physical and psychological toll of combat, particularly in the case of wounded soldiers recovering before their return to Canada. Whether mentoring ground troops or providing strategic advice to the commander, he distinguished himself as a first-rate soldier who was critical to the unit’s integrity and success.

Lieutenant-Colonel Jocelyn J. J. M. J. Paul, M.S.C., C.D.
Wendake Indian Reserve, Quebec
Meritorious Service Cross

As commanding officer of 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group, from April to October 2009, Lieutenant-Colonel Paul displayed outstanding leadership and tactical brilliance as he planned and conducted highly successful counter-insurgency operations that significantly degraded the enemy’s combat capability. Through his innovative, bold and focused approach, he disrupted the insurgency’s ability to gain tactical advantage during the traditional fighting season, and strengthened the Afghan government’s authority within Kandahar province. His superb command of his unit ensured its success, advanced international efforts in Afghanistan, and brought great credit to Canada and to the Canadian Forces.

Corporal François-Jonathan Gilles Michel Hébert, M.S.M.
Montréal, Quebec
Meritorious Service Medal

As a mentor to numerous senior members of the Afghan National Army from April to October 2009, Corporal Hébert worked well above his rank to improve their operational capacity.  His leadership was vital to the planning and execution of numerous joint combat operations, and greatly influenced the level of professionalism in the soldiers he mentored. Corporal Hébert’s exemplary performance, tactical acumen and fighting abilities enabled the Afghan National Army to maximize its disruption of insurgent activities.

Major Joseph Serge Raynald Morin, M.S.M., C.D.
Lac Mégantic, Quebec
Meritorious Service Medal

As the senior mentor to the commander of an Afghan National Army battalion from April to October 2009, Major Morin was instrumental in improving the battalion’s operational success.  Applying his vast experience and knowledge, his mentorship of Afghan soldiers on vital issues, such as the occupation of a forward operating base, resulted in effective partnered combat operations with the Canadian battle group. Major Morin’s outstanding leadership and dedication allowed the Afghan National Army to greatly improve its combat capabilities and brought great credit to the Canadian Forces.

Major Yannick Pépin, M.S.M., C.D. (Posthumous)
Warwick, Quebec
Meritorious Service Medal

Major Pépin deployed to Afghanistan in April 2009 as commander of a squadron of combat engineers supporting the Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group.  His leadership and technical expertise enabled those under his command to successfully clear roadways that were vital to the movement of Canadian, Afghan and coalition soldiers.  Tragically, he was killed in action by an improvised explosive device while commanding a mounted patrol on September 6, 2009. Major Pépin’s unwavering dedication to Canada’s mission in Afghanistan saved lives and brought great credit to Canada.

The Meritorious Service Medal awarded to the late Major Pépin will be presented to his spouse, Ms. Annie Roberge.

Sergeant Joseph François Colin Piché, M.S.M., C.D.
St-Basile-de-Portneuf, Quebec
Meritorious Service Medal

As a mentor to an Afghan National Army infantry company from April to October 2009, Sergeant Piché demonstrated frontline leadership that led the unit to excel during numerous joint operations.  Often under fire and facing fierce resistance, he inspired the Afghans to persevere and consistently defeat the enemy. His exceptional awareness and tactical acumen prevented an imminent friendly fire incident on one occasion, when his company was being attacked from multiple directions. His soldiering abilities and mentorship skills greatly improved the capacity of the company and ensured its operational success.

Chief Warrant Officer Joseph Gérard Gilbert Poirier, M.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.
Verdun, Quebec
Meritorious Service Medal

As regimental sergeant-major of the Kandahar Provincial Reconstruction Team in Afghanistan from February 2009 to February 2010, Chief Warrant Officer Poirier fulfilled his duties with the utmost professionalism. He played a pivotal role in implementing a new policy for interaction with the local population, which greatly enhanced the perception of Canadian soldiers in the community. He also worked tirelessly to reinforce a spirit of co-operation between the military and civilian elements of the unit, and sought to enhance everyone’s quality of life through the advancement of morale-building projects. His advice to senior leadership coupled with his outstanding mentorship of all members of the unit were critical to its operational success and brought great credit to Canada.

Chief Warrant Officer Ernest Gérard Joseph Poitras, M.S.M., C.D.
Tracadie, New Brunswick
Meritorious Service Medal

Chief Warrant Officer Poitras was part of the Joint Task Force Afghanistan Air Wing from May to November 2009. He was faced with a number of challenges, including the introduction of a new aircraft to the mission and limited operational experience within the air wing. Nevertheless, his leadership was instrumental in forging a cohesive and operationally focused team. His devotion and professionalism ensured his team was equipped to face the challenges associated with providing the best possible aviation support to ground forces in Afghanistan. His unwavering mission focus contributed to the operational success of the air wing and brought great credit to the Canadian Forces.


DECORATIONS FOR BRAVERY

Created in 1972, the Canadian Bravery Decorations express symbolically the nation’s gratitude to those people who risk their lives to save or protect others, defying in the process the instinct for self-preservation. As no two incidents in which bravery is exhibited are the same in all respects and all such incidents are conditioned by the circumstances under which they are performed, the three decorations were created to reflect the hazards encountered in widely differing situations:

The Cross of Valour (C.V.) recognizes acts of the most conspicuous courage in circumstances of extreme peril.

The Star of Courage (S.C.) recognizes acts of conspicuous courage in circumstances of great peril.

The Medal of Bravery (M.B.) recognizes acts of bravery in hazardous circumstances.

All three decorations may be awarded posthumously.


LIST OF RECIPIENTS

STAR OF COURAGE

Private Adam J. P. Fraser, S.C.

St-Jean-sur-Richelieu and

Courcelette, Que.

Corporal Déri J. G. Langevin, S.C.

Chicoutimi and Québec, Que.

Corporal Marc-André Poirier, S.C.

Amos and Québec, Que.


MEDAL OF BRAVERY

Lieutenant-Colonel Douglas Wynn Baird, M.B., C.D.

Aylesford, N.S.

Leading Seaman Cory K. Bond, M.B.

La Poile, N.L. and Beaverbank, N.S.

Sergeant André Coallier, M.B.

Montréal, Que.

Archie L. Coughlin, M.B.

Kensington, P.E.I.

Lieutenant(N) Christopher Michael Devita, M.B., C.D.

Bedford, N.S. and Richmond Hill, Ont.

Constable Karine Giroux, M.B.

Montréal, Que.

Geneviève Otis-Leduc, M.B.

Montréal, Que.

Alexandre Phaneuf, M.B.

Laval, Que.

Constable David Pilote, M.B.

Montréal, Que.

Jean-François Renault, M.B.

Mirabel, Que.

Tyler Glenn Sampson, M.B. (posthumous)

Halifax, N.S.

Constable Daniel Tétreault, M.B.

Montréal, Que.


CITATIONS

Private Adam J. P. Fraser, S.C.
St-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Courcelette, Quebec
Corporal Déri J. G. Langevin, S.C.
Chicoutimi and Québec, Quebec
Corporal Marc-André Poirier, S.C.
Amos and Québec, Quebec
Star of Courage

On July 19, 2009, corporals Marc-André Poirier and Déri Langevin and Private Adam Fraser demonstrated exceptional courage while helping people who had been injured following the crash of a civilian helicopter at the Kandahar Air Field, in Afghanistan. Alerted to the incident, the three rescuers rushed to the scene outside the security wall of their camp. They crossed a dangerous area engulfed in flames and dodged frequent explosions to reach two victims who were lying in a ditch near the wreckage of their burning helicopter. They moved the wounded to a safe place and provided first aid until medical personnel arrived. The rescuers had to abandon their search for other victims when they realized they were in a minefield. Thanks to the rescuers’ efforts, five of the 21 passengers and crew survived. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Douglas Wynn Baird, M.B., C.D.
Aylesford, Nova Scotia
Medal of Bravery

On December 30, 2008, Lieutenant-Colonel Doug Baird rescued a man who had fallen through the ice while skating on Aylesford Lake, in Nova Scotia. The victim had ventured out onto thin ice and had fallen into the frigid water. Upon hearing of the situation, Lieutenant-Colonel Baird wrenched a large branch from a tree and skated several hundred metres to the victim’s location. He then crawled approximately 40 metres to extend the branch out to him. The ice was thin enough to see the water beneath it, and it was breaking up between them. Instructing the man to grab the branch, Lieutenant-Colonel Baird inched his way slowly backwards, pulling the victim to safety.

Leading Seaman Cory K. Bond, M.B.
La Poile, Newfoundland and Labrador and Beaverbank, Nova Scotia
Lieutenant(N) Christopher Michael Devita, M.B., C.D.
Bedford, Nova Scotia and Richmond Hill, Ontario
Medal of Bravery

On May 27, 2008, Lieutenant(N) Christopher Devita and Leading Seaman Cory Bond rescued the captain of a small sailboat in dangerous weather conditions, off the coast of Halifax, Nova Scotia. A distress call was received from a boat that was taking on water. The captain had been braving the elements and bailing his vessel for many hours. Despite the rough seas, high winds and thick fog that caused extremely poor visibility, Lieutenant(N) Devita launched out with Leading Seaman Bond in a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) to assess the stricken vessel’s situation and conduct the safe rescue of its captain. The sailboat repeatedly struck the inflatable boat, making it nearly impossible and extremely dangerous for the men to attach a tow line. They struggled through the risky conditions for over two hours before finally securing the line. Leading Seaman Bond then manoeuvred the rescue craft close to the sailboat, while Lieutenant(N) Devita caught the victim as he leapt onto their boat. They towed the sailboat to a nearby Canadian Coast Guard ship and safely transferred onboard.

Sergeant André Coallier, M.B.
Montréal, Quebec
Constable Karine Giroux, M.B.
Montréal, Quebec
Constable David Pilote, M.B.
Montréal, Quebec
Medal of Bravery

On June 22, 2009, Sergeant André Coallier and constables Karine Giroux and David Pilote, of the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal, risked their lives to help a young, suicidal woman, in Lasalle, Quebec. Arriving on the scene, the police officers saw the woman in the waters of the St. Lawrence River. Wearing a heavy backpack, she had difficulty keeping her head above water. Constables Giroux and Pilote grabbed a lifebuoy and swam more than 100 metres through the current to reach the woman. Sergeant Coallier swam to the mouth of the bay, where he would be able to grab the woman before she reached the rapids. Fighting against strong countercurrents, he tried to get her attention while constables Giroux and Pilote approached her from behind. They were able to gain control of the struggling woman and bring her to safety.

Archie L. Coughlin, M.B.
Kensington, Prince Edward Island
Medal of Bravery

On February 16, 2009, Archie Coughlin jumped into the freezing water of the Gulf of St. Lawrence to rescue a co-worker from a possible drowning, in Stanhope, Prince Edward Island. While working with a construction crew to repair a wharf, a co-worker fell into the water and was quickly pulled towards the open sea. The victim, who did not know how to swim, lost his life jacket upon hitting the water and was struggling to stay afloat. Mr. Coughlin ran along the shore to get ahead of the victim, and then jumped in, wearing a life jacket and holding a life ring tied to a rope. Fighting against the strong current in the outgoing tide, he reached the partially submerged victim who was headed towards an ice floe. Mr. Coughlin grabbed the struggling man by the collar and held onto him tightly while others pulled them both safely to shore.

Geneviève Otis-Leduc, M.B.
Montréal, Quebec
Medal of Bravery

On June 24, 2009, Geneviève Otis-Leduc placed herself at considerable risk to rescue two friends from a possible drowning in the Batiscan River, in Notre-Dame-de-Montauban, Quebec. Ms. Otis-Leduc and her friends had been celebrating Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day when two of them decided to dive into a waterfall. The two friends wound up in turbulent waters, in the middle of the river. One of them suffered an asthma attack, panicked and grabbed onto the other. Ms. Otis-Leduc made her way to them and grabbed the friend who had difficulty breathing. She brought him safely to shore and then swam back to her second friend who, weighed down by his clothing, was in danger of drowning. Although the victim unintentionally pushed her many times below the surface, Ms. Otis-Leduc succeeded in pulling him safely to shore. Her perseverance and brave actions enabled her to save her two friends. 

Alexandre Phaneuf, M.B.
Laval, Quebec
Medal of Bravery

On May 26, 2009, Alexandre Phaneuf jumped into the freezing waters of the Rivière des Prairies to save the life of a suicidal woman, in Laval, Quebec. While crossing a bridge, Mr. Phaneuf noticed several onlookers peering over the side. When asked, they explained that a young woman had jumped off the bridge. Mr. Phaneuf, an experienced lifeguard, immediately went to the water’s edge, where he saw the victim floating some distance away. He swam toward the victim, who kept drifting farther and farther away. Fighting against the strong current, he finally reached the woman. He spoke calmly to her and safely towed her back to the riverbank.

Jean-François Renault, M.B.
Mirabel, Quebec
Medal of Bravery

On April 29, 2009, Jean-François Renault risked his life to help a man who had fallen from the roof of a house and was being strangled by his safety harness, in Mirabel, Quebec. The victim had been installing solar panels when he lost his footing and fell. During the fall, the harness slipped up and tightened around his throat. Mr. Renault quickly climbed a ladder onto another roof beneath the victim and lifted him onto his shoulders. The man then regained consciousness and became very agitated, trying to remove his harness. The erratic movement threatened to cause Mr. Renault to lose his balance, but despite his precarious position, he was able to maintain control until help arrived.

Tyler Glenn Sampson, M.B. (posthumous)
Halifax, Nova Scotia
Medal of Bravery

On August 14, 2005, 25-year-old Tyler Sampson lost his life trying to help a friend who was being attacked by an intruder, in Glen Haven, Halifax County, Nova Scotia. Staying overnight at his friend's home, Mr. Sampson went to sleep in an upstairs bedroom while his friend, a quadriplegic, slept downstairs. The intruder, who lived nearby, entered the house in the early morning, carrying a knife. He made his way to the downstairs bedroom and attacked the sleeping man. Mr. Sampson, awakened by his friend's screams, ran to help him. Unarmed, he confronted the attacker, bravely fought with him and sustained multiple stab wounds. Sadly, both Mr. Sampson and his friend died from their injuries in the hours that followed the attack.

The Medal of Bravery awarded to the late Mr. Sampson will be presented to his mother, Mrs. Janice Sampson.

Constable Daniel Tétreault, M.B.
Montréal, Quebec
Medal of Bravery

On August 24, 2008, Constable Daniel Tétreault, of the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal, rescued two men from a possible drowning in the St. Lawrence River, in Lasalle, Quebec. Constable Tétreault was on patrol in the area with his partner when they noticed two men at a distance, struggling with their personal watercraft. They declined the officers’ offer to help, but soon found themselves caught in the current and pulled towards the rapids. Constable Tétreault grabbed a life ring attached to a short length of rope, swam out to the victims and threw the rope to them. The men clung desperately to the lifeline, as Constable Tétreault struggled against the strong current to pull them ashore. The tired men then lost hold of the rope. Despite being completely exhausted from his efforts, the rescuer grabbed a second life ring thrown to him by another officer and made his way back to the victims. This time, the men were able to hold on while other police officers pulled the three of them to shore.


GOVERNOR GENERAL’S NORTHERN MEDAL

In 2005, the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson, then governor general of Canada, created the Governor General’s Northern Medal, a medallion to be awarded to citizens whose actions and achievements have contributed to the evolution and constant reaffirmation of the Canadian North as part of our national identity.

RECIPIENT AND CITATION

Mary J. May Simon, O.C., O.Q.
Kangiqsualujjuaq, Quebec and Ottawa, Ontario

Born in Kangiqsualujjuaq, Quebec, on Nunavik’s Ungava Coast, Mary Simon is devoted to the well-being of the Inuit in Canada and abroad. A champion of social justice, particularly for children and youth, Ms. Simon has made it her life’s work to increase recognition of Aboriginal rights and northern affairs.

Through her diplomacy and leadership, Ms. Simon has gained the respect of many heads of governments and international organizations. She is a valued advisor on important northern issues such as sovereignty, the environment, economic development and social policy.

In addition to her many accomplishments, including the negotiation of the recognition of Aboriginal rights in the Constitution Act, 1982, Ms. Simon became the first Inuk to hold an ambassadorial position. She is also known as the principal architect of Canada’s northern policy. 

A true visionary and passionate advocate for Inuit culture, Ms. Simon is a continuous source of inspiration and is committed to the preservation of Canada’s northern identity.