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News

Presentation of Military and Bravery Decorations

June 24, 2015
Updated June 25, 2015

Governor General to Honour Military Personnel at Rideau Hall

OTTAWA—His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada, will present Meritorious Service Decorations (Military Division) and Bravery Decorations to members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and allied forces at a ceremony at Rideau Hall, on Friday, June 26, 2015, at 10:30 a.m.

On this occasion, the Governor General will present 5 Meritorious Service Crosses (Military Division) and 25 Meritorious Service Medals (Military Division) to individuals whose specific achievements have brought honour to the CAF and to Canada. He will also present 8 Medals of Bravery to CAF members who have performed acts of bravery in hazardous circumstances.

A media schedule for the presentation ceremony, a list of recipients and their citations, and additional information on the Meritorious Service Decorations and the Bravery Decorations are attached.

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Media interested in covering the ceremony are asked to confirm their attendance with the
Rideau Hall Press Office. Due to construction work, they must arrive at the residence’s main entrance no later than 10 a.m. on the day of the ceremony.
 

For information on the ceremony:

Marie-Pierre Bélanger
Rideau Hall Press Office
613-998-9166
marie-pierre.belanger@gg.ca

For information on the recipients:

Department of National Defence
Media Liaison Office
1-866-377-0811
613-996-2353
www.forces.gc.ca

Follow GGDavidJohnston and RideauHall on Facebook and Twitter.


CEREMONY SCHEDULE

Members of the media are asked to observe the following schedule:

10:30 a.m.:      Ceremony begins
                        The Governor General speaks
                        The Governor General presents the decorations
                        The Vice Chief of the Defence Staff speaks
11:30 a.m.:      Ceremony ends
11:45 a.m.:      Media interviews with recipients

 

RECIPIENTS

MERITORIOUS SERVICE DECORATIONS

Meritorious Service Cross (Military Division)

Colonel Steve Joseph Yves Charpentier, M.S.C., C.D.

Trois-Rivières, Que.

Colonel Pierre Frédéric André Demers, M.S.C., C.D.

Sherbrooke, Que.

Lieutenant-Colonel Marie Hélène Gisèle Fontaine, M.S.C., C.D.

Ottawa, Ont.

Admiral William Harry McRaven, M.S.C. (United States Navy)

Pinehurst, North Carolina, U.S.A.

Captain(N) Stuart Ross Moors, M.S.C., C.D.

North Bay, Ont.


Meritorious Service Medal (Military Division)

Chief Warrant Officer William John Crabb, M.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.

Edmonton, Alta.

Lieutenant-Colonel Lee John Hammond, M.S.M., C.D.

North Vancouver, B.C.

Lieutenant-Colonel Mario Albert, M.S.M., C.D.

Dolbeau, Que.

Chief Petty Officer Douglas Beauregard, M.S.M. (United States Navy)

Dartmouth, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Colonel Sean Thomas Boyle, O.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.

Edmonton, Alta.

Commander Stephen Wade Carter, M.S.M., C.D.

Ottawa, Ont.

Commander Daniel Alan Charlebois, M.S.M., C.D.

Kingston, Ont.

Major Bryan Dockter, M.S.M. (United States Air Force)

Richland, Washington, U.S.A.

Lieutenant-Colonel Lawrence Joseph Marc André Dufour, M.S.M., C.D.

Jonquière, Que.

Lieutenant-Colonel David Michael Ferguson, M.S.M., C.D.

London, Ont.

Commodore Patrick Terence Finn, C.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.

Montréal, Que.

Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Foster, M.S.M., C.D.

Pembroke, Ont.

Commander Jeffrey Michael Hamilton, M.S.M., C.D.

New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A.

Sergeant Bradley Douglas Hiscock, M.S.M., C.D.

Grand Falls, N.L.

 

 

Lieutenant(N) John Arthur Keenan, M.S.M., C.D.

St. Catharines, Ont.

Major Heather Joy MacCharles, M.S.M., C.D.

Kingston, Ont.

Honorary Colonel James Gerald Massie, M.S.M.

Barrie, Ont.

Lieutenant-Colonel Stephan Marcel Plourde, M.S.M., C.D.

Montréal, Que.

Colonel David Alan Rundle, O.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.

Kingston, Ont.

Lieutenant-Colonel Timothy William Shopa, M.S.M., C.D.

Ottawa, Ont.

Lieutenant-Colonel David William Shuster, M.S.M., C.D.

Winnipeg, Man.

Chief Warrant Officer Edward Patrick Smith, M.S.M., C.D.

Glace Bay, N.S.

Captain Dean Harvey Vey, M.S.M., C.D.

Labrador City, N.L.

Major-General Christine Theresa Whitecross, O.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.

Ottawa, Ont.

Commander David Russell Wilcox, M.S.M., C.D.

Halifax, N.S.

 

BRAVERY DECORATIONS 

Medal of Bravery 

Corporal Garet James Avery, M.B.

Sudbury and Kanata, Ont.

Leading Seaman Evan Beaton, M.B., C.D.

New Haven, P.E.I. and Lawrencetown, N.S.

Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Raymond DeProy, M.B., C.D.

Vancouver, B.C. and
Ottawa, Ont.

Master Warrant Officer Volker Kock, M.B., C.D.

Greenfield Park, Que. and Borden, Ont.

Warrant Officer Stanley Dwayne Mercredi, M.B., C.D.

Fort Smith, N.W.T. and Petawawa, Ont.

Corporal Richard Joseph Bryan Yvan Royer, M.B.

Shearwater, N.S.

Chief Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Salter, M.B., C.D. (Retired)

Nairn Centre and Russell, Ont.

Ordinary Seaman Benne Wiebe, M.B.

Aylmer, Que. and Kingston, Ont.

Please note that the information in this media advisory reflects
the rank of the recipient at the time of the event for which they are being recognized.

 

CITATIONS

MERITORIOUS SERVICE DECORATIONS

Meritorious Service Cross (Military Division)

Colonel Steve Joseph Yves Charpentier, M.S.C., C.D.
Trois-Rivières, Quebec 

From July 2011 to July 2012, Colonel Charpentier did an outstanding job as chief of staff of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti. As the head of a multinational headquarters, he calmly and with great wisdom rose to every challenge before him, even in such complex situations as civil unrest and tropical storms. Colonel Charpentier’s leadership, diplomacy and work ethic were tremendously beneficial to the mission and brought honour to the Canadian Armed Forces.

Colonel Pierre Frédéric André Demers, M.S.C., C.D.
Sherbrooke, Quebec 

From June 2013 to July 2014, Colonel Demers did an exemplary job as part of the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Of particular note, he developed and implemented a successful campaign against illegal armed groups that had been terrorizing the population of North Kivu. Colonel Demers excelled in this complex multinational environment and his outstanding leadership helped to restore peace to the region.

Lieutenant-Colonel Marie Hélène Gisèle Fontaine, M.S.C., C.D.
Ottawa, Ontario 

While deployed with the Armed Forces Academy of Medical Science in Afghanistan, from July 2012 to July 2013, Lieutenant-Colonel Fontaine distinguished herself by her expertise and excellent work. Her efforts to develop and advance training programs for health care providers have greatly improved the quality of care offered to the Afghan National Security Forces. Lieutenant-Colonel Fontaine’s dedication has brought great honour to the Canadian Armed Forces.

Admiral William Harry McRaven, M.S.C. (United States Navy)
Pinehurst, North Carolina, United States of America

As commander of the United States Special Operations Command from August 2011 to July 2014, Admiral McRaven demonstrated unequivocal support to Canadian Special Operations Forces Command (CANSOFCOM). Through his vision and guidance in framing the Global Special Operations Force Network, he has enabled CANSOFCOM to take a leading role in global special force operations supporting the government of Canada. Admiral McRaven’s commitment to shared bi-national interests greatly improved the global special force network and strengthened strategic military Canadian-American relations.

Captain(N) Stuart Ross Moors, M.S.C., C.D.
North Bay, Ontario 

While deployed to the Canadian Embassy in Egypt as the Canadian defence attaché for North Africa from August 2011 to August 2014, Captain Moors enabled key regional and Canadian decision makers to effectively manage a myriad of crises during frequent periods of instability, uncertainty and civil unrest. Captain Moors’ advice and leadership in support of Canada’s diplomatic corps and deployed task forces during difficult times were invaluable, and brought great honour to the Canadian Armed Forces and to Canada.


Meritorious Service Medal (Military Division)

Chief Warrant Officer William John Crabb, M.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.
Edmonton, Alberta

Chief Warrant Officer Crabb was deployed to Kabul, Afghanistan, as the NATO Training Mission sergeant-major from April 2013 to March 2014. His remarkable enthusiasm, initiative and collaboration with his mission counterparts, including the sergeant-major of the Afghan National Army, were essential to forging a non-commissioned officer corps within the Afghan National Security Forces. He achieved this by setting and personally exceeding the professional standard he set for others. Chief Warrant Officer Crabb’s leadership and command presence reflected well upon the Canadian Armed Forces and Canada.

This is the second Meritorious Service Medal awarded to Chief Warrant Officer Crabb.

Lieutenant-Colonel Lee John Hammond, M.S.M., C.D.
North Vancouver, British Columbia

From June 2013 to March 2014, Lieutenant-Colonel Hammond excelled as the deputy commander of the Canadian Contribution to the NATO Training Mission in Afghanistan. His leadership helped to ensure that Canadian personnel in Afghanistan consistently delivered on their NATO commitments. He synchronized Canada’s personnel drawdown plan from Afghanistan with the larger NATO plan, while preserving Canada’s national imperatives in the region. Lieutenant-Colonel Hammond, through his accomplishments, enhanced Canada’s reputation within the multinational environment.

This is the second Meritorious Service Medal awarded to Lieutenant-Colonel Hammond.

Lieutenant-Colonel Mario Albert, M.S.M., C.D.
Dolbeau, Quebec

Lieutenant-Colonel Albert demonstrated outstanding dedication toward the Canadian Cadet Organization while serving as its head from 2006 to 2008, and from 2011 to 2014. Through his leadership, commitment and sound advice, Lieutenant-Colonel Albert played a key role in helping young Canadians in uniform reach their full potential, notably through the creation of the Junior Canadian Ranger Program.

Chief Petty Officer Douglas Beauregard, M.S.M. (United States Navy)
Dartmouth, Massachusetts, United States of America 

As a member of the Cyber Support Detachment within Maritime Forces Atlantic from August 2009 to June 2014, Chief Petty Officer Beauregard was indispensable to the Canadian intelligence community. A consummate professional and skilled operator, he provided critical not-readily-available data access to two of Her Majesty’s Canadian ships deployed to the Arabian Sea, bringing great honour to himself, to the Canadian Armed Forces and to the United States Navy.

Colonel Sean Thomas Boyle, O.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.
Edmonton, Alberta 

As the director of Canada’s Combined Aerospace Operations Centre from July 2012 to July 2013, Colonel Boyle was responsible for the execution of all domestic and international Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) operations. With impressive leadership, innovative skills and dedication, he streamlined the Canadian NORAD Region’s flying responsibilities, which led to its best evaluation in history. The Air Force’s successes worldwide were directly attributable to his functional excellence and professionalism, and brought credibility and significant honour to the RCAF and to Canada.

Commander Stephen Wade Carter, M.S.M., C.D.
Ottawa, Ontario

As commanding officer of Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Charlottetown, Commander Carter led his assigned forces through two distinct and challenging operations in the Mediterranean and Arabian seas, between January and August 2012. He laid the groundwork for future visits while simultaneously enhancing maritime security in a region rarely frequented by Canadian warships. Maximizing the use of all assets at his disposal, and exhibiting leadership and tactical acumen, Commander Carter ensured the ship’s operational success and enhanced Canada’s international reputation.

Commander Daniel Alan Charlebois, M.S.M., C.D.
Kingston, Ontario 

As the commanding officer of Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Regina, Commander Charlebois was crucial to the success of two different missions between February 15 and August 3, 2014. Initially deployed in an antiterrorism role in the Indian Ocean, his ship was re-tasked on short notice to reinforce NATO allies in the Mediterranean Sea. Despite this sudden change, Commander Charlebois displayed great leadership and command presence, ensuring the crew adapted seamlessly, which brought great credit to the Canadian Armed Forces.

Major Bryan Dockter, M.S.M. (United States Air Force)
Richland, Washington, United States of America

From July 2010 to July 2012, Major Dockter was the chief training officer at 436 Transport Squadron, in Trenton, Ontario, during its transition to the newly acquired CC130J Hercules aircraft. With dedication and professionalism, and despite limited resources at his disposal, he developed and sustained a robust aircrew training program while simultaneously supporting operations worldwide in minimal time. Major Dockter’s efforts have had a lasting and positive impact on the development of this new capability in the Canadian Armed Forces.

Lieutenant-Colonel Lawrence Joseph Marc André Dufour, M.S.M., C.D.
Jonquière, Quebec

From July 2012 to August 2013, Lieutenant-Colonel Dufour did impressive work within the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A visionary with a tremendous sense of diplomacy, he ensured that stakeholders from 11 countries agreed on the development of a new mandate and the introduction of the intervention brigade. His efforts were vital to implementing innovative changes within the Mission, bringing great honour to Canada.

Lieutenant-Colonel David Michael Ferguson, M.S.M., C.D.
London, Ontario

While deployed to the United Nations Mission in South Sudan from June 2013 to June 2014, Lieutenant-Colonel Ferguson excelled as the acting chief of the Mission Support Center during the extremely turbulent civil uprising in Juba. He maintained an uninterrupted flow of supplies to all UN elements by keeping logistics in place, all while prioritizing, coordinating and assuring relief efforts for 37 500 refugees. Working under the constant pressure of a potential evacuation, Lieutenant-Colonel Ferguson was instrumental to the success of the UN’s operation.

Commodore Patrick Terence Finn, C.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.
Montréal, Quebec 

Commodore Finn served as Director General Maritime Equipment Program Management (DGMEPM) and chief engineer of the Royal Canadian Navy from July 2010 to November 2012. Demonstrating impressive leadership abilities and sharing expert advice, he played a significant role in the Halifax-class modernization project and in the return to operations of Victoria-class submarines. His dedication became the driving force behind the modernization project and helped to improve the effectiveness of DGMEPM’s organization.

Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Foster, M.S.M., C.D.
Pembroke, Ontario 

From 2012 to 2014, Lieutenant-Colonel Foster served as the operational team lead for the most ambitious commemoration effort ever undertaken by the Canadian Armed Forces. He was paramount to the success of the Afghanistan Memorial Vigil, the National Day of Honour for Afghanistan and multiple activities related to the War of 1812. Responsible for the development of the concepts of operation and the synchronization of countless individuals’ efforts, he enabled the flawless execution of these high-profile national events. 

Commander Jeffrey Michael Hamilton, M.S.M., C.D.
New Orleans, Louisiana, United States of America 

While deployed to the Arabian Sea region as the commanding officer of Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship Toronto and as the commander of Operation ARTEMIS from April to July 2013, Commander Hamilton integrated seamlessly into the crew despite joining the ship at mid-deployment. Commander Hamilton, through his leadership, indomitable spirit and professional ability, ensured his crew reached their maximum potential, which culminated in the largest seizure of narcotics ever conducted by a Canadian warship. His efforts, and those of his crew, brought great credit to the Canadian Armed Forces and to Canada.

Sergeant Bradley Douglas Hiscock, M.S.M., C.D.
Grand Falls, Newfoundland and Labrador
Captain Dean Harvey Vey, M.S.M., C.D.
Labrador City, Newfoundland and Labrador 

On October 27, 2011, Sergeant Hiscock and Captain Vey were respectively the flight engineer and the first officer onboard Rescue 915, a Cormorant helicopter, when they were tasked to rescue two hunters stranded in the Arctic waters near Igloolik, Nunavut. Facing high winds and rough seas, Sergeant Hiscock skilfully operated the hoist, while Captain Vey used his expert flying skills to recover the two hunters, as well as three search and rescue technicians who had previously parachuted in to assist them. Through their commendable efforts and actions, Sergeant Hiscock and Captain Vey contributed to the mission success, and brought great credit to the Canadian Armed Forces.

Lieutenant(N) John Arthur Keenan, M.S.M., C.D.
St. Catharines, Ontario 

As the officer in charge of the Royal Navy Northern Diving Unit in Scotland, United Kingdom, Lieutenant(N) Keenan displayed professionalism and perseverance in dismantling three
letter bombs while preserving vital forensic evidence for law enforcement officials. His fortitude and efforts under extremely challenging circumstances led to the apprehension and eventual conviction of domestic terrorists. Lieutenant(N) Keenan’s initiative and steadfast determination brought great credit upon himself and the Canadian Armed Forces.

Major Heather Joy MacCharles, M.S.M., C.D.
Kingston, Ontario 

Between 2009 and 2011, Major MacCharles exhibited personal courage, professionalism and leadership in her efforts to champion the issue of family violence and sexual assault. While spearheading a Canadian Forces-wide review on the subject, she identified deficiencies in the existing Canadian Forces policy. As a direct result of her perseverance, this sensitive issue was brought to the attention of the Armed Forces Council, which resulted in a complete review of and subsequent changes to the Canadian Forces’ approach.

Honorary Colonel James Gerald Massie, M.S.M.
Barrie, Ontario 

In 2009, Honorary Colonel Massie initiated the establishment of the Operation Hero scholarship fund, which has since raised more than $850,000, benefiting military dependants who attend Georgian College. His mentorship inspired creative, collaborative projects where military and civilian personnel worked together for the betterment of their shared communities. Honorary Colonel Massie’s energy, professionalism and dedication have benefited the Canadian Armed Forces as well as his local community of Barrie.

Lieutenant-Colonel Stephan Marcel Plourde, M.S.M., C.D.
Montréal, Quebec

Lieutenant-Colonel Plourde was deployed to Kabul, Afghanistan, as the leader of the Armed Forces Academy of Medical Sciences Advisory Team from July to December 2013. He developed and implemented a comprehensive health services plan for the Afghan National Security Forces by assessing how best to provide care with limited medical resources and time. His knowledge and leadership established a sustainable and relevant plan that was sensitive to the Afghans’ needs. Lieutenant-Colonel Plourde’s indispensable work brought honour to the Canadian Armed Forces and to Canada.

Colonel David Alan Rundle, O.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.
Kingston, Ontario

As the Canadian Armed Forces military attaché from July 2011 to August 2014 at Canadian Defence Liaison Staff (Washington), Colonel Rundle served as a critical information conduit between the United States Army and the Canadian Armed Forces. His professionalism and leadership ensured unprecedented Canadian access and influence during critical operations in Afghanistan, while his contribution to the Canadian-United States Engagement Strategy Agreement was instrumental in the management of exchange and liaison positions. Colonel Rundle’s diplomatic efforts contributed to strengthening relations with the U.S., which brought great credit to Canada.

Lieutenant-Colonel Timothy William Shopa, M.S.M., C.D.
Ottawa, Ontario 

From February 2013 to February 2014, Lieutenant-Colonel Shopa showed exceptional leadership as project director of the CF-18 Replacement Program Evaluation of Options Team. In this role, he served as the authoritative voice of the fighter community. His expertise, professionalism and remarkable execution of duty contributed significantly to DND’s renewed confidence in the program’s evaluation process.

Lieutenant-Colonel David William Shuster, M.S.M., C.D.
Winnipeg, Manitoba 

Lieutenant-Colonel Shuster was deployed to Kabul, Afghanistan, as the deputy commander of police training, NATO Training Mission, from November 2012 to November 2013. As the principal advisor to the Afghan National Police, he built strong relationships and established a dynamic esprit-de-corps that helped unite coalition forces and the Afghan police. The creation of a professional police force was a direct result of Lieutenant-Colonel Shuster’s leadership and guidance. His contributions to Afghan security were a credit to the Canadian Armed Forces and to Canada.

Chief Warrant Officer Edward Patrick Smith, M.S.M., C.D.
Glace Bay, Nova Scotia 

From June 2013 to March 2014, Chief Warrant Officer Smith excelled as task force sergeant-major of the Canadian Contribution to the NATO Training Mission in Afghanistan. His tireless efforts to engender goodwill with allied nations ensured Canada retained its influential role and its well-earned credibility during mission withdrawal. Chief Warrant Officer Smith’s presence enhanced the Canadian Armed Forces’ international reputation and helped to solidify Canada’s legacy in Afghanistan.

Major-General Christine Theresa Whitecross, O.M.M., M.S.M., C.D.
Ottawa, Ontario 

In May 2013, Major-General Whitecross was elected as the International Military Sport Council (CISM) secretary general. In this position, she combined the arduous work of overseeing the 66-year-old military sporting organization with her Canadian Armed Forces responsibilities. Not only did she succeed in doing both roles exceptionally well, but she also crafted new strategic and business plans, which effectively transformed CISM into a modern organization shaped by shared Canadian values.

Commander David Russell Wilcox, M.S.M., C.D.
Halifax, Nova Scotia 

As the Canadian Armed Forces Health Services attaché to the United States from August 2011 to July 2014, Commander Wilcox was devoted to the development and progression of international medical agreements and policy. In particular, he was integral in the negotiation of a reciprocal health care agreement that ensures Forces personnel are well positioned to work in a combined health services environment, and that members stationed in the United States will receive proper medical care.
 

BRAVERY DECORATIONS 

Medal of Bravery 

Corporal Garet James Avery, M.B.
Sudbury and Kanata, Ontario
Ordinary Seaman Benne Wiebe, M.B.
Aylmerm, Quebec and Kingston, Ontario 

On February 6, 2013, Corporal Avery and Ordinary Seaman Wiebe put their lives at risk to prevent a man from setting himself on fire in Kingston, Ontario. They slowly approached the distraught man and pinned him to the ground before he could set fire to his gasoline-soaked clothing, thus saving him from tragedy.

Leading Seaman Evan Beaton, M.B., C.D.
New Haven, Prince Edward Island and Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia 

On June 19, 2013, Leading Seaman Beaton rescued a fellow diver who had become tangled in his lifeline during a deep-diving operation in the Bedford Basin, in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Leading Seaman Beaton was forced to disregard the normal safe rate of descent to reach the victim, whose air supply was severely limited. At great personal risk, Leading Seaman Beaton then skipped decompression protocol to bring the victim quickly to the surface, thus saving his life. 

Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Raymond DeProy, M.B., C.D.
Vancouver, British Columbia and Ottawa, Ontario 

On May 19, 2012, Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class DeProy risked his life to rescue a fellow diver in Saanich Inlet, British Columbia. The victim had experienced a malfunction with his breathing regulator and started to resurface at an excessive speed. Chief Petty Officer 2nd Class DeProy recognized the signs of distress and, despite the inherent danger of a rapid ascent, pulled the struggling diver to the surface as quickly as possible. Sadly, the victim did not survive.

Master Warrant Officer Volker Kock, M.B., C.D.
Greenfield Park, Quebec and Borden, Ontario 

On March 2, 2012, Master Warrant Officer Kock risked his life to rescue five young women from a burning car, following a collision near Bowling Green, Ohio, U.S.A. Braving the heat and smoke, Master Warrant Officer Kock tried in vain to open the mangled doors but was forced back by the rapidly spreading flames. Once firefighters had put out the fire, he assisted them in getting the victims out of the wreck. Sadly, three of the victims succumbed to their injuries.

Warrant Officer Stanley Dwayne Mercredi, M.B., C.D.
Fort Smith, Northwest Territories and Petawawa, Ontario 

On January 13, 2013, Warrant Officer Mercredi disarmed a soldier who was threatening to kill himself, in Kabul, Afghanistan. As the distraught man drew his service pistol from its holster, Warrant Officer Mercredi tackled him to the floor, wrestled the weapon from his hand and restrained him until help arrived.

Corporal Richard Joseph Bryan Yvan Royer, M.B.
Shearwater, Nova Scotia 

On May 2, 2013, Corporal Royer rescued a fellow shipmate while on patrol in the Indian Ocean. Corporal Royer’s colleague had fallen from the ship into the rough waters. Lowered from a helicopter, Corporal Royer dove under the surface to retrieve the victim. Struggling against the strong pull of the waves and the panicking man, Corporal Royer managed to get him into a rescue harness. They were then both hoisted up onto the deck of the ship.

Sergeant Jason Cary Bromstad, M.B., C.D.
Regina, Saskatchewan and Ottawa, Ontario
Paul David Charbonneau, M.B.
Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec and Tincap, Ontario
Chief Petty Officer 1st Class Michael Salter, M.B., C.D. (Retired)
Nairn Centre and Russell, Ontario 

On June 29, 2012, Sergeant Bromstad, Chief Petty Officer 1st Class  Salter and Mr. Charbonneau pulled an injured man from a burning vehicle on Highway 401, near Gananoque, Ontario. As a result of a collision, the fuel tank of the victim’s vehicle ruptured and the leaking fuel ignited. In spite of the rapidly spreading flames, the rescuers worked to pry open the door and drag the victim to safety, moments before the truck became fully engulfed.

The decorations awarded to Sergeant Bromstad and Mr. Charbonneau were presented at a previous ceremony.


FACT SHEET ON MERITORIOUS SERVICE DECORATIONS

The Meritorious Service Decorations include a military division and a civil division, with two levels each: a medal and a cross. The military division recognizes individuals for their outstanding professionalism and for bringing honour to the Canadian Armed Forces and to Canada. The civil division recognizes individuals who have performed an exceptional deed or an activity that brought honour to the community or to Canada.

The Meritorious Service Cross (Military Division) recognizes a military deed or activity that has been performed in an outstandingly professional manner, according to a rare high standard that brings considerable benefit or great honour to the Canadian Armed Forces. 

The Meritorious Service Medal (Military Division) recognizes a military deed or activity performed in a highly professional manner, according to a very high standard that brings benefit or honour to the Canadian Armed Forces.

These decorations are an important part of the Canadian Honours System, which recognizes excellence. Meritorious Service Decorations honour either a single achievement or an activity over a specified period. The Meritorious Service Decorations are open to both Canadians and non-Canadians.

Anyone may nominate an individual for the civil division of the Meritorious Service Decorations, while military candidates are recommended by the chief of the Defence Staff. Nominations and awards may be made posthumously, but nominations for activities that occurred prior to June 1984, the year in which the honour was first created, are not accepted.

  

FACT SHEET ON BRAVERY DECORATIONS

The Bravery Decorations were created in 1972. They recognize people who risk their lives and choose to defy their own instinct of survival to try to save a loved one or a perfect stranger whose life is in immediate danger.

The three levels of the Bravery Decorations reflect the degree to which the recipients put themselves at risk:

The Cross of Valour (C.V.) recognizes acts of the most conspicuous courage in circumstances of extreme peril.

The Star of Courage (S.C.) recognizes acts of conspicuous courage in circumstances of great peril.

The Medal of Bravery (M.B.) recognizes acts of bravery in hazardous circumstances.

Eligibility and nominations

Anyone is free to propose the name of a person who has risked injury or death in an attempt to rescue another person. The incident need not have taken place in Canada, and the rescuer need not be Canadian, but Canadians or Canadian interests must be involved. The decorations may be awarded posthumously.

Nominations must be made within two years of the incident, or within two years after a public entity, including a court, a quasi-judicial tribunal or a coroner, has concluded its review of the circumstances surrounding the incident or act of bravery.

For more information on the Meritorious Service Decorations and the Bravery Decorations, please visit www.gg.ca/honours.